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COOKING METHODS FOR CEREALS - FOR CEREALS


Cooking Methods For Cereals - Cooking Prime Rib Steak.



Cooking Methods For Cereals





cooking methods for cereals






    cooking
  • The practice or skill of preparing food

  • (cook) someone who cooks food

  • Food that has been prepared in a particular way

  • the act of preparing something (as food) by the application of heat; "cooking can be a great art"; "people are needed who have experience in cookery"; "he left the preparation of meals to his wife"

  • The process of preparing food by heating it

  • (cook) prepare a hot meal; "My husband doesn't cook"





    methods
  • method acting: an acting technique introduced by Stanislavsky in which the actor recalls emotions or reactions from his or her own life and uses them to identify with the character being portrayed

  • (method) a way of doing something, especially a systematic way; implies an orderly logical arrangement (usually in steps)

  • A particular form of procedure for accomplishing or approaching something, esp. a systematic or established one

  • Orderliness of thought or behavior; systematic planning or action

  • (A Method) Return to Cookie Mountain is the third full-length album by the American rock group TV on the Radio.





    cereals
  • (cereal) made of grain or relating to grain or the plants that produce it; "a cereal beverage"; "cereal grasses"

  • A grain used for food, such as wheat, oats, or corn

  • A grass producing such grain, grown as an agricultural crop

  • A breakfast food made from roasted grain, typically eaten with milk

  • (cereal) a breakfast food prepared from grain

  • (cereal) grass whose starchy grains are used as food: wheat; rice; rye; oats; maize; buckwheat; millet











Mixing guasimo tree bark with water for building wood-conserving stoves




Mixing guasimo tree bark with water for building wood-conserving stoves





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From Smaller World Trip Participant Kavita Coombe:

My trip to Panama was the most rural adventure I have ever experienced. We started out by flying into Panama City where we stayed in a hotel for the first night and had an orientation with the group. The next morning SHI staff drove us to the work site in Chagres National Park.

We were staying in the community of Lago Alajuela, accessed by boat. Each morning started at 5:30 am. We would get ready in the dark and pack up all of our stuff and move all the school desks into the 2-room cement schoolhouse we were sleeping in so that the children could go to school during the day. The kind women of the community would make us breakfast consisting of locally grown coffee, plantains or bananas, and cereal. We would hike daily through the rainforest about 20 minutes to the water, boat about 30 minutes, then hike 30-40 minutes through more rainforest to the rice paddy site or other sites we were working. All communities were made up of approx. 5-10 families and could only be accessed by boat.

We would work all day. Lunch and dinner was also prepared by local women and consisted of rice, beans, fried cassava, fried plantains, (fish or chicken if desired) and coffee. Vegetables are considered a luxury and due to SHIs work, many people in this area are growing various fruits and vegetables. I enjoyed bananas, lemons, grapefruit, green coconut, plantains, tomatoes, cucumbers and locally grown coffee! Volunteers build mold for wood-conserving stove.

We worked on three main projects. Our first project was to construct a community rice paddy. To do this, we had to measure out a 20m x 20m area and clear all the brush. I got to use a machete to cut down grass. Then form a 30cm x 30cm trench on all 4 sides. To do this you hoe, dig and move the dirt out of the trenches. The next step was to level all the ground in the middle. We had to loosen the dirt by pick-axe or hoe and shovel it into wheelbarrows to then fill the trenches we just dug. I know, how counter-productive&the reason for this is that filling it with this clay-like dirt and tamping it down forms a solid barrier that is partially impermeable to water. After completing the digging part of it, you allow the paddy to settle for 24 hours. Then plant the rice that has been started 3 weeks prior to the building of the paddy. After the rice takes root in the paddy, you can flood the center and it will grow very efficiently in this way. Normally the Panamanians in this area grow rice on hillsides using slash-and-burn farming methods. Growing rice in a paddy increases crop yield by 400 - 800% annually and grows enough rice to feed the entire community. This paddy can be harvested three times a year. Our work was a demonstration paddy that costs about $100 to build. We raised enough money to build paddies for 20 communities!

Our second project built 5 wood-conserving stoves. This stove is made from an adobe-like brick. We started with a platform of small cement bricks filled in the center with dirt. We cut a large board to form a rectangular wood frame fHike back to base camp mixed with thick-gauge wire to hold in place. Next we made a big pile on the ground of red dirt, sand, chopped pine needles, manure, cement and mix by shoveling. A Guasimo tree paste helps to hold everything together, so soaking the bark of this tree in water releases a jelly-like substance that when mixed into the water forms a viscous glue. We poured this glue into the dirt mixture and shoveled to mix again. We moved this dirt into our wood frame by bucket quantities and tamped everything down each time. Finally, you carefully remove the wood frame and then carve out the area for pots and for wood and to vent the smoke. These stoves use less wood, concentrate the heat so they cook faster, and minimize the smoke that is inhaled.

Our third project was a school garden. This basically consisted of clearing two large hillsides of all grasses (again using a machete) and among the tarantulas. We dug up the dirt in rows for planting. We planted cassava, corn, tomatoes, and cucumbers. We also put chicken wire all the way around the garden because of the chickens, hens, and roosters running all over the place -at least they are free-range! This school garden was a garden that the children of the community of Lago Alajuela would care for.Sun set over Lake Alajuela.

At the end of the day, we would make the journey back to Lago Alajuela with enough daylight for about 4 people to shower all the dirt and sweat off before dinner (the 10 of us took turns showering in a tin privacy shelter under a spicket), the rest of us would shower in the dark after dinner. By the end of all that, all you desire is sleep without any notion of the hard cement floor only to be waken by roosters crowing the next morning.

Overall I had a wonderful trip. It was a great experience working and co











Panama May 05 013




Panama May 05 013






--------
From Smaller World Trip Participant Kavita Coombe:

My trip to Panama was the most rural adventure I have ever experienced. We started out by flying into Panama City where we stayed in a hotel for the first night and had an orientation with the group. The next morning SHI staff drove us to the work site in Chagres National Park.

We were staying in the community of Lago Alajuela, accessed by boat. Each morning started at 5:30 am. We would get ready in the dark and pack up all of our stuff and move all the school desks into the 2-room cement schoolhouse we were sleeping in so that the children could go to school during the day. The kind women of the community would make us breakfast consisting of locally grown coffee, plantains or bananas, and cereal. We would hike daily through the rainforest about 20 minutes to the water, boat about 30 minutes, then hike 30-40 minutes through more rainforest to the rice paddy site or other sites we were working. All communities were made up of approx. 5-10 families and could only be accessed by boat.

We would work all day. Lunch and dinner was also prepared by local women and consisted of rice, beans, fried cassava, fried plantains, (fish or chicken if desired) and coffee. Vegetables are considered a luxury and due to SHIs work, many people in this area are growing various fruits and vegetables. I enjoyed bananas, lemons, grapefruit, green coconut, plantains, tomatoes, cucumbers and locally grown coffee! Volunteers build mold for wood-conserving stove.

We worked on three main projects. Our first project was to construct a community rice paddy. To do this, we had to measure out a 20m x 20m area and clear all the brush. I got to use a machete to cut down grass. Then form a 30cm x 30cm trench on all 4 sides. To do this you hoe, dig and move the dirt out of the trenches. The next step was to level all the ground in the middle. We had to loosen the dirt by pick-axe or hoe and shovel it into wheelbarrows to then fill the trenches we just dug. I know, how counter-productive&the reason for this is that filling it with this clay-like dirt and tamping it down forms a solid barrier that is partially impermeable to water. After completing the digging part of it, you allow the paddy to settle for 24 hours. Then plant the rice that has been started 3 weeks prior to the building of the paddy. After the rice takes root in the paddy, you can flood the center and it will grow very efficiently in this way. Normally the Panamanians in this area grow rice on hillsides using slash-and-burn farming methods. Growing rice in a paddy increases crop yield by 400 - 800% annually and grows enough rice to feed the entire community. This paddy can be harvested three times a year. Our work was a demonstration paddy that costs about $100 to build. We raised enough money to build paddies for 20 communities!

Our second project built 5 wood-conserving stoves. This stove is made from an adobe-like brick. We started with a platform of small cement bricks filled in the center with dirt. We cut a large board to form a rectangular wood frame fHike back to base camp mixed with thick-gauge wire to hold in place. Next we made a big pile on the ground of red dirt, sand, chopped pine needles, manure, cement and mix by shoveling. A Guasimo tree paste helps to hold everything together, so soaking the bark of this tree in water releases a jelly-like substance that when mixed into the water forms a viscous glue. We poured this glue into the dirt mixture and shoveled to mix again. We moved this dirt into our wood frame by bucket quantities and tamped everything down each time. Finally, you carefully remove the wood frame and then carve out the area for pots and for wood and to vent the smoke. These stoves use less wood, concentrate the heat so they cook faster, and minimize the smoke that is inhaled.

Our third project was a school garden. This basically consisted of clearing two large hillsides of all grasses (again using a machete) and among the tarantulas. We dug up the dirt in rows for planting. We planted cassava, corn, tomatoes, and cucumbers. We also put chicken wire all the way around the garden because of the chickens, hens, and roosters running all over the place -at least they are free-range! This school garden was a garden that the children of the community of Lago Alajuela would care for.Sun set over Lake Alajuela.

At the end of the day, we would make the journey back to Lago Alajuela with enough daylight for about 4 people to shower all the dirt and sweat off before dinner (the 10 of us took turns showering in a tin privacy shelter under a spicket), the rest of us would shower in the dark after dinner. By the end of all that, all you desire is sleep without any notion of the hard cement floor only to be waken by roosters crowing the next morning.

Overall I had a wonderful trip. It was a great experience working and c









cooking methods for cereals







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